Street ART Lettering Workshop

This Saturday, July 28, 2018, Legendary artist Eric “KING CRE8” Walker will conduct a workshop that guides participants through the process of drawing the various fonts and or elements used in graffiti and street art. Participants will be encouraged to design their own signature, words, phrases or art elements in a graffiti style.

Workshop will be held at the Pauline Foster Teen Center ( 2nd. Floor) 1:00pm to 3:00pm.

San Diego Central Library located at 330 Park Blvd. San Diego, California 92101

No prior art experience needed. This class is recommended for ages 12 to 18.

 

Space is limited! Only a few seats remaining, please register at the link below:

https://sandiego.librarymarket.com/street-art-lettering-workshop-legendary-artist-eric-king-cre8-walker

LA Liber Amicorum

LA Liber Amicorum is a unique artists’ book that binds together 143 works on paper from more than 150 of Los Angeles’s leading graffiti and tattoo artists. The individual creative approaches to letter forms, hand styles, symbols, signs, and themes display the city’s diverse landscape of graffiti and street art.

The book, funded and donated by art collector Ed Sweeney, drew some of its inspiration from rare books and prints, particularly from a type of manuscript in the Getty Research Institute’s collections called a liber amicorum (“book of friends”). Such books were originally bound with blank leaves, which multiple contributors then filled with illuminated coats of arms, watercolors, poetry, and calligraphy as mementos for the owner.

LA Liber Amicorum emulates the black sketchbooks, or piecebooks, that street artists often carry with them and inscribe for each other. Sweeney envisioned the Getty Black Book, as it is also known, as a way of gathering these artists’ work into a single bound collection, symbolizing the transformation of the creative output by rival crews of street artists into an LA Book of Friends.

This book was on view at ESMoA from June 8–September 21, 2014, as part of the exhibition SCRATCH, which featured a selection of 16th- and 17th-century rare books from the Research Institute’s special collections, as well as a full-gallery “open black book” installation curated by local graffiti artists.